Can Jack Russells be left Alone?

I often get asked ‘Can Jack Russells be left alone?’ In a nutshell, they can be left alone but not for too long and they won’t like it! Mae sure that you give them plenty to do while your gone or your house may be unrecognisable when you return!

Can Jack Russells be left alone?

The simple answer is yes – a Jack Russell Terrier can be left alone for a maximum of around 3-4 hours, but only in a safe environment and necessary to do so. Jack Russells really don’t like to be left alone though, and so today’s blog is all about how you can make it as comfortable as possible for them and minimise their anxiety.

Jack Russells can get Separation Anxiety

Because Jack Russells are very loving and loyal to their owners, this means that they can suffer from separation anxiety. They will be anxious when left alone and this can manifest itself in the following behaviours….

  • Constant barking and howling
  • Peeing and poo-ing indoors in protest
  • Destructive behaviour such as chewing furniture and wallpaper
  • Pacing around the house

Tips for leaving your Jack Russell alone

You will be pleased to know that with the right training and support it is possible for your Jack Russell to get used to being left alone. Remember that leaving him to go for a movie or a drink for a couple of hours is OK for him, but leaving him for a full 8 hour day while you work or go to Alton Towers is probably not! It is a great idea to find a good and reliable dog sitter or walker to help out when you need it.

Here are our top tips for leaving your JRT alone:

  • Build him up slowly – start by leaving him just 15 minutes or half an hour while you go to the shop. Then increase slowly up to 3-4 hours over a period of a few weeks. This will reassure him that you are always coming back.
  • Walk him before you go out – even if it’s just for 10-15 minutes. This will get him ’empty’ to minimise fouling and allow him to spend some energy so that he settles down.
  • Get a dog cam such as the Furbo – this will allow you to keep an eye on him and know whether you need to rush back in an emergency.
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  • Get a pet sitter or a family friend to come and see him when you are out for longer than 4 hours. This will settle him and minimise the barking or howling.
  • Leave him plenty of things to do. For example, you can hide treats in a snuffle mat or fill his Kong Extreme with his favourite treats such as frozen yoghurt or cottage cheese! These things will distract him from the fact that you are gone.
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  • Give him the same freedom that he always has. For example, if you give the dog the run of the downstairs when you are at home – give him the same freedom when you leave. Shutting him in will feel different and claustrophobic and may set off separation anxiety and make howling worse.
  • Move anything dangerous out of the way when you leave your dog – electrical wires, chocolate, anything your dog may eat will need to be moved out of reach for safety.
  • We recommend emptying the bins as our JRT often raids them when we leave him alone!

Remember that it is a risk to leave your dog with any toy – particularly a new and unfamiliar one. We have heard reports of people’s dogs eating their licky mats and needing emergency surgery because they ate the plastic! Always supervise your dog with a new toy first and then when you are confident that you can leave them with it, still leave the dog cam on so you can always see what is happening.

If you enjoyed this article you might also like to read about 10 facts about Jack Russells

Long Haired Jack Russells

Long haired Jack Russells are a very popular type of Jack Russell Terrier.  They can have curly coats that make them look more like a Poodle than a Jack Russell, or smoother but longish hair. Some are smooth long haired JRTs. In this article, we will talk about the main differences between these dogs and other types of Jack Russells.

Long Haired Jack Russell Grooming

If you are seriously considering getting a long haired Jack Russell, then you need to be ready for a lot of brushing.  Your dog will need daily brushing and combing so that his coat stays clean and healthy.

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Long haired JRTs also require more grooming than their short-haired counterparts in order to achieve the best possible look. You will need to regularly trim their hair and nails. Some of the grooming tools that you may need include a slicker brush, metal dog comb and a nail clipper.

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If you do not have the time to keep up with your dog, then you might consider getting a more low maintenance breed.  Not only is caring for long haired JRTs labor intensive, but it can also be costly if you decide to pay a professional groomer to care for your dog’s coat.

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Curly or Straight?!

Long-haired Jack Russell terriers can have curly hair or very straight hair. One common Long Haired JRT is a curly coated dog known as an LHR (long haired retriever). However, some dogs perceived to be long haired Jack Russells may actually be hybrids such as the Jackapoo (Jack Russell Poodle cross).

The other type of long haired JRT is the Smooth coat in which the dog’s coat is smooth, but they are still long haired.

They are Still Jack Russells!

The accepted definition of a Jack Russell Terrier has always been that it is a tri-colored, compact sized working dog .  This breed was recognized by the AKC (American Kennel Club) in 1936.  

While many people think Short Hair and Long Hair are different breeds, they’re actually not.  They are the same breed, just with a different type of coat. But remember that you will get variety in the breed and the only real way to know for sure is to know your dogs parents or do a doggy DNA test.

So their personality will still be very energetic and active like a classic short haired Jack Russell.

Long Haired Jack Russells are so unusual and special and we totally love them!

If you enjoyed this article you might also like to read about Black and Tan Jack Russell

10 facts about Jack Russells

The Jack Russell terrier is by far my favourite dog! Happy and energetic, there is never a dull moment if you own one of these dogs! Today’s blog brings you 10 facts about Jack Russells…

Top 10 Facts about Jack Russells

1) One of the Fastest Dog Breeds in the World!

They are extremely energetic. Despite their small size, they can run at incredibly fast speeds for short periods of time. They are one of the worlds fastest dog breeds and can run up to 38mph! Jack Russells make great companions for people with an active lifestyle. Jack Russells enjoy running and playing with their owners, and will keep up without any problems.

2) Jack Russells bark a lot!

Jack Russells bark a lot compared with most other dogs. But they usually won’t sound the alarm unless something is worth warning their owners about. This means that they make great little watchdogs!

3) Jack Russells were first bred in 1795

Jack Russells were first bred in 1795 by hunting enthusiast Reverend John Russell. He wanted a sturdy working terrier for bolting foxes out of burrows.

4) The first female JRT shares a name with an American President!

The first female terrier type dog that John Russell bred from was called TRUMP!

5) The Jack Russell is a big chewer!

The Jack Russell enjoys chewing and will chew most things it comes across – even if it hurts! I’d recommend getting a Kong Extreme which you can fill with their favourite food to keep them occupied when left alone.

6) A Very Intelligent Dog

The Jack Russell is known to be a very intelligent dog and can learn a variety of tricks, behaviours and commands. It is also big on playing games with its master. Jack Russell terriers can be great at small dog agility.

7) High Jumpers

A Jack Russell terrier is an excellent jumper – most JRT’s can jump up to 5 feet in the air! Want to test this? Hold his favourite toy inline with your shoulders and watch him go!

8) Recognised by the Kennel Club since 2016

The original Jack Russell ‘show dogs’ were the Parsons Russell terrier which was often mistaken for the classic Jack Russell but is actually slightly taller and has a rougher coat. In 1999, the breed name of the Parson Jack Russell Terrier was changed to the Parson Russell Terrier to differentiate the two breeds. The Parson Russell is now well established in the show ring and retains its working abilities as a ‘fox’ terrier

The Jack Russell Terrier was given official recognition by The Kennel Club only very recently in 2016 – so you will be pleased to know that now the JRT is Kennell club recognised in its own right!

9) Fiesty and Fearless!

The Jack Russell is a fearless dog, and will defend itself (and its master) against any sort of threat. A Jack Russell will take on animals much bigger than itself and not back down.

10) The Jack Russell Terrier is the world’s best known terrier breed

The Jack Russell Terrier is the world’s best known terrier breed, thanks to its success in the show ring and its celebrity owners. You might also recognise the Jack Russell from movies such as ‘The Mask’ with Jim Carrey and TV shows such as Frasier!

If you enjoyed this article you might also like to read about Can Jack Russells be left Alone? and Benefits of Owning a Jack Russell

Raising a Jack Russell Terrier Puppy

Raising a Jack Russell Terrier Puppy

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I live in Liverpool, UK and I have raised two Jack Russells from puppies. The Jack Russell Terrier is a very energetic breed. Jack Russell puppies are intelligent and quick to learn, but they demand a lot of time and attention when they first come to your home, so make sure that you have around 6 weeks off work or working from home to settle him in and train him! Today’s blog is all about raising a Jack Russell terrier puppy – I hope that you enjoy it!

Is a Jack Russell Puppy right for you?

Jack Russell Terriers are not the best breed for very many people because they require a lot of attention. If you spend long hours at work or don’t like playing with your dog every day, this isn’t the right breed for you. A Jack Russell terrier will fit in well with people who have family members that work from home and who enjoy the outdoors.

Jack Russell Terriers need lots of attention and love, so you should make sure you spend plenty of time with them. Jack Russell Terriers don’t do well when they are left alone and they can develop separation anxiety. So if you can’t be around to play with them on a daily basis, then it is a good idea to get another type of dog that does better when left alone for long periods.

Bringing your Jack Russell Puppy Home

The first few days and weeks are crucial to helping your Jack Russell puppy to settle in. Make sure that he has a nice bed and is comfortable there. Get him into a routine and have lots of interaction with you and the rest of the family, but don’t overwhelm him!

It is important that when raising your Jack Russell Terrier puppy, you are always around to supervise them because they are very playful and curious by nature. Jack Russell Terriers are notorious for getting into trouble when left alone because if they do, they will get themselves hurt or sick.

When raising your Jack Russel Terrier puppy, it is important to make sure you are around as much as possible so he stays out of trouble and doesn’t become bored or lonely. Jack Russell Terriers that are left alone all day long tend to get into things they shouldn’t when owners aren’t watching. Some things like electrical cords or other items can hurt your dog, so it is important to keep an eye on them at all times.

Setting up his Bed and Food

When raising a Jack Russell Terrier for the first day, you will want to set up his bed, food and water bowls where they are easily accessible. This way when he sees them, it will remind him of where to go and lay down, and when he goes for water or food, he will learn that it is the proper place to do so. You should introduce your dog to his new home slowly when first getting him.

Get him used to the Family

The best way to make sure that your Jack Russel Terrier puppy won’t be sad after leaving his mother is by getting him used to his new home and family. Jack Russell Terriers never forget the scents of those who raised them, so when they smell something from their past they get very excited, which is why introductions are important and should be done slowly so he doesn’t get overwhelmed.

Keep Mealtimes Consistent

Mealtimes should be kept consistent because if they are not, it will confuse the puppy and he won’t know when to expect food. You should feed your Jack Russell Terrier puppy three times a day because if you give him too much food at once, he may regurgitate it on your carpet or floor.

Toilet Training your Jack Russell Puppy

Toilet training is one of the first and most important aspect of raising a Jack Russell terrier puppy. When you first bring your puppy home he will need to be taken outside every hour if not more! Always praise your Jack Russell puppy when he wees or poos in the correct place – he will very quickly get used to where to do it.

After the first week he should be taken out every two hours or so. You can also take him outside less often if you are home for longer periods of time.

When raising your Jack Russel Terrier puppy for the first few months, it is very important that you make sure they go to the bathroom on a regular schedule. If they are allowed to go when and where they want, it will be harder for you because you won’t know if they have gone or not.

Playing and Socialising your Pup

The second thing you need to do if you want your dog to live a long healthy life is to make sure that he gets plenty of exercise every day. You should take him on walks, play fetch with him or let him run in a fenced-in area where he can get some energy out.

It’s important to make sure that you only take your Jack Russell terrier puppy outside in parks and to meet other puppies after he has had all of his initial vaccinations. Otherwise, your pup will be exposed to harmful and even deadly canine diseases.

Training your Jack Russell Terrier Puppy

When first training a Jack Russell Terrier dog, make sure that the area is safe and free of any kind of objects that could hurt them, like hot wires or broken glass. Make sure also that the area is free of any kind of small animals that they may see as prey. Jack Russell terriers are very prey driven dogs and you want them to be fully focused on you during training.

Use Positive Reinforcement Training Techniques

If your Jack Russell Terrier puppy does something bad, don’t hit him because all that is going to do is make him afraid of you and not respect you. In fact if you want your Jack Russell Terrier puppy to respect you, the best thing to do is give him praise when he does something good whether it be coming home from outside or bringing you his favorite toy.

Jack Russell Terriers love people and will jump up on you when they see you because they love attention from their owners, so when you come home from work and he gets excited, remember to give him a treat so he will learn that when someone comes home they are not a threat.

Basic Obedience

You should start with simple commands such as sit, stay and come when called. Start off by holding your dog on a leash so you have control over him when he gets excited. After you get him used to the leash and hand signals, then you can start taking him off-leash. When first training your Jack Russell Terrier puppy, it is better to start off with simple commands and work up to tougher ones at a later time. Make sure you are patient when training your dog because if they don’t learn the first time, getting angry at them will get you nowhere.

It is important to start off your Jack Russel Terrier puppy on simple commands like “sit” and “stay,” but it can take up to two months for your dog to fully understand what you are ordering him to do.

Find out what Rewards he responds well to

It is important that you train your Jack Russell Terrier as a puppy so he will be easier to handle after he grows up. It is not recommended that you try and train an older dog because they are more stubborn and harder for you to get them to listen. When you first start training your Jack Russell Terrier puppy, have some treats or a favourite toy with you such as a ball and use it as reward for him when he does something good.

Recall Training

If your dog doesn’t come back after he has been called, stand still until he comes back on his own.

It is a good idea to have your Jack Russel Terrier puppy wear a collar and identification tag in case he ever gets lost.

When taking your Jack Russel Terrier puppy out for their first walk, make sure you take him to the same places and follow the same routine each time. Always keep a leash on your dog so that if he does run away or gets out of control, you can pull him back.

Exercising my Jack Russell Puppy

It is very important to make sure that you give your Jack Russel Terrier puppy enough exercise each day so he doesn’t become overweight or lethargic. Make sure you wake your dog up from sleeping for a walk or playtime because they need to get out and stretch their legs to stay active. However, don’t overdo the walkies with your puppy – their bones are still developing. When raising a Jack Russell puppy short 10-15 minute walks are perfect. A good rule of thumb to follow is a ratio of five minutes of exercise per month of age (up to twice a day) until the puppy is fully grown e.g. 15 minutes (up to twice a day) when 3 months old, 20 minutes when 4 months old and so on. Once your puppy is fully grown he will be able to go for much longer, and even enjoy extended 2-3 hour hikes with you!

Are you Raising a Jack Russell Terrier Puppy?

Are you raising a Jack Russell Terrier Puppy? How are you getting on? Please comment on our blog below – we’d love to hear from you!

Further reading – you might want to read about:

Are Jack Russells Affectionate

Are Jack Russells Affectionate?

So many people ask me ‘are Jack Russells affectionate?’ This affectionate dog breed gets along well with their owners and often children, but they are typically not friendly toward other dogs.  Jack Russell terriers have a high prey drive and make good hunters, so owners will possible want to keep them on leashes when in public to avoid injury or escape.

Introducing the Jack Russell Terrier

As a hunting dog bred specifically for chasing foxes other animals, Jack Russell terriers require a high amount of daily activity. While they are excellent pets for people who can provide this level of stimulation, they may not be suited to owners with low exercise tolerance or an apartment lifestyle.

Are Jack Russells Affectionate to their Owners?

It is true that Jack Russell terriers are very affectionate to their owners. They bond quickly with their owners when adopted as adults dogs. Most Jack Russell owners say that they are velcro dogs – sitting by your side and following you everywhere that you go! Once you have a positive bond with your Jack Russell you will be likely to be able to stroke and cuddle it and your dog will be affectionate towards you.

These dogs aim to please their owners and this is why they are great dogs for doing tricks. Properly trained Jack Russells can also be excellent watchdogs for home safety.

Are Jack Russells affectionate towards children?

Jack Russells can be affectionate towards children if they have been well socialised with kids from a puppy and as long as the children are respectful of the dog. Get your puppy used to the children in your family giving them treats and doing training with them. Discourage your children from running fast and screaming near the dog as this can cause a Jack Russell to be snappy. Teach your children to stroke the dog gently and teach them what not to do e.g. pulling tail or ears. Remember never to leave a dog or child alone together as if a dog snaps or becomes aggressive this can be dangerous.

Are Jack Russells affectionate to other dogs or pets?

Because Jack Russell terriers have such a high prey drive, it is important to socialize them properly from a young age and train them using positive reinforcement methods so that they do not take their aggression out on other dogs or other animals in the home. If you have a reactive Jack Russell it may not be a good idea to introduce cats or other small furry creatures (rats, rabbits, guinea pigs, hamsters) into the home. Remember that Jack Russells were bred to hunt and kill and this is an instinct making it very difficult to train out of them.

Additional Training that your Jack Russell might need

They also require ongoing obedience training because some of the breed’s natural instincts include digging holes and chewing objects like shoes and furniture.  As working dogs bred for hunting, these tendencies should be modified as much as possible with appropriate training. In addition to their physical needs, Jack Russells require owners who are consistent and patient. The breed has a high energy level that makes them active throughout the day, so people who do not have the time to provide daily exercise should consider another dog instead.

The Overall Verdict

Jack Russell terriers make excellent family pets for owners who can successfully modify their natural instincts, of but they may not be the right breed for everyone.

If you are considering adopting a Jack Russell, please research the associated costs of ownership before adopting one into your home. Do not adopt from an untrustworthy breeder or pet store – always adopt from a shelter or rescue organization whenever possible .  This will ensure your pup comes with proper shots and spay/neuter information, as lieu well as increased likelihood of being socialized properly by a professional.

If you enjoyed this article you might also like to read about Raising a Jack Russell Terrier Puppy

Working Jack Russell

Working Jack Russell

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The Jack Russell terrier, or ‘Jack’ as they are commonly known, is one of the most popular breeds in Britain. Originally from the rural areas of England, this breed was bred from a mix of fox hounds and old terriers, who had to work hard on small farms. The Jack Russell was named after an English huntsman called John “Jack” Russell. They were originally bred in England as the working Jack Russell.

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Introducing the Working Jack Russell

This enthusiastic little dog has become a household favourite over the years thanks to its friendly and loyal nature. It’s extremely intelligent as well as being very loving, making it one of the best dogs to have around the home. The Jack Russell is a dog that loves to play with people and is always happy to be by your side – especially if you’re taking part in a game of fetch! But he will also love to work on a farm.

The working Jack Russell is a small dog, with a lean build. The Jack Russell coat comes in different shades of tan or gold depending on what part of England it was bred from. The long topcoat has fox-like markings on it. These markings can vary from black, red and grey through to white, brindle and mottled. This coat has dense undercoat which makes doggy hair more water resistant.

What are Working Jack Russells used for?

The Jack Russell has a short, muscular and slightly longer than tall body. It has very small ears that sit at the top of its head and are covered in fur. It’s a strong dog with a high energy level – bred with a high prey drive. That makes these dogs perfect for bushing (flushing vermin out of bushes) and ratting (clearing farms of rats). They enjoy this kind of work because it satisfies their natural prey drive. It’s fun for them and a natural way for them to get exercise.

Originally, the working Jack Russell was bred for fox hunting both above and below ground. However, fox hunting is now banned in England as it is seen as a cruel sport. But a Jack Russell has the prey drive for anything small and fast moving such as squirrels, rabbits or rats!

Does a Jack Russell make a good Family Pet?

The Jack Russell is incredibly friendly and confident with people so is great for beginner dog owners.

The temperament of the Jack Russell is cheerful and loyal to its owner. It’s a true companion and will happily sit by your feet for hours, but it does need to be exercised regularly so it doesn’t become too lazy!

This active, energetic breed is only recommended as a family pet for experienced dog owners and those who have an active outdoor lifestyle with a training focussed mindset. A Jack Russell is ideal for someone who wants an intelligent and confident dog that can be trained on its own. You can still satisfy his/her prey drive by playing with a flirt pole with your dog.

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The Jack Russell needs regular exercise and isn’t suited to life at home with people (adults or children) who may push the dog around too much. This breed has many traits of the terrier family, which means there are many different training methods for this breed of dog. We always like to recommend positive reinforcement dog training which is reward based.

If you enjoyed this article you might also like to read about Training a Jack Russell

Jack Russell Whippet Cross

Jack Russell Whippet Cross

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So you’re interested in getting a Jack Russell-Whippet Cross? Be prepared for a fast, cheeky and lovely pooch! The good news is that a Jack Russell Whippet cross can make an excellent family pet if well brought up and well trained. So what is a Jack Russell Whippet cross really like?

My First Dog was a Jack Russell Whippet Cross

Our first family dog was a Jack Russell Whippet cross called Patch. He was a gorgeous dog – looked very much like a Jack Russell but with much longer legs. We had him from a pup and he was well trained and could go off lead. He was the first of many Jack Russell type dogs that I fell in love with.

What does a Jack Russell Whippet Cross look like?

A Jack Russell crossed with a whippet will probably look like an extremely tall and slender Jack Russell with a slightly longer nose. They often retain the cute Jack Russell markings including patches on the face and a side spot as well as the slim body and long legs of a whippet. They will probably by taller than your average Jack Russell and reach up to around 55cm in height (max heigh of a male Whippet). Their fur is more likely to be on the smooth side as most Whippets have smooth short hair, although it could be scruffier fur if the mother was a long haired Jack Russell! Male dogs are often taller than the females (bitches).

Personality and Temperament

A Jack Russell crossed with a whippet is likely to be a very friendly and loyal family pet. Jack Russells are known to be very loyal and somewhat protective of their owners. Some of them get very attached to their owners and can develop separation anxiety, so it’s important to get them used to it slowly and leave things for them to do when they are left alone, such as chews and dog puzzles. They are very intelligent dogs and will need mental stimulation as well as physical – play Jack Russell games with them that encourage them to use their nose.

Feeding your Jackawhip

Jack Russell Whippet cross dogs can eat a diet of dried food (Kibble) or wet meat dog food. Discuss with the vet and breeder the type of food that will be suitable for your dog. I usually would feed my JRT Whippet twice a day.

Jack Russells and Whippets both have a tendency to ‘guzzle’ their food down at full speed. This isn’t always great for their digestion, so you could consider getting a slow feeder dog bowl or a proper whippet dog bowl.

Exercising your Jack Russell Whippet Cross

As Jack Russells and whippets are both very high energy dogs, they will need a lot of exercise – about 1-2 hours a day including off lead running where safe and possible to do so. In fact, the top speed of an adult whippet running at full speed is actually 56 km/hour – can you believe that?! Needless to say that if they don’t get this exercise they can demonstrate destructive behaviour such as chewing and destroying things around the house.

Training your Jack Russell Whippet Cross

They will also require a great deal of training and socialisation, as with any dog. Positive reinforcement training (clicker training with rewards to mark positive behaviour) works well for encouraging good behaviour and minimising bad habits in these dogs.

You should definitely start out with some Jack Russell Obedience with your dog including sit, down, stand and stay. Once they have mastered that you will be able to move on to teaching your dogs a few tricks. Our Jack Russell Cross Patch used to balance a biscuit on his nose and then only toss it up and catch it when we said that he could! He could also play dead and walk on his hind legs! They are really very clever and training your dog will improve your bond with each other.

Remember that because they are prey driven dogs then they could get snappy around fast moving objects such as bikes or running children, and so it’s important to supervise them, especially around kids.

If you enjoyed this article you might also like to read about Jack Russell Mix Breeds

When is a Jack Russell Considered a Senior Dog

When is a Jack Russell Considered a Senior Dog?

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The great news for Jack Russell owners is that they tend to live longer than the larger breeds.  Plus, they reach seniority later than larger breeds too.  While many of our large breeds of canine companion start to slow down as early as eight years old the Jack Russell as a breed generally remain in the “adult” rather than “senior” category until they are aged 10-12.

Being robust, active little dogs the Jack Russell in particular tend to enjoy good health and longevity. 

Signs that Your Jack Russell is becoming a senior dog

Eyes:  You notice that the eyes develop a blue tinge.  This is something called Nuclear Sclerosis, it’s a normal part of aging and the terrier can still see.  Nuclear Sclerosis is easily confused with cataracts which lead to blindness, so if in doubt get it checked by your vet.  

Colour: There dark patches fade through adulthood and this will suddenly accelerate as they become paler, less distinct and even replaced by grey hair.

The Senses Decline: As your Jack Russell goes into seniority his or her senses of hearing, sight and smell gradually decline.  You will notice that these senses get weaker over time.

Stiff When Getting Up: Instead of bounding up with enthusiasm, your terrier now gets up slowly and stretches before greeting the day or the opportunity for a walk.

Less Active:   He or she may jump and leap about less, they may even seem to want shorter walks.  Or you find yourself walking more slowly so that they can keep up.

Cognitive Disease: You may experience noticeable signs of declining cognitive function as they age.   They may be easily confused, stopping and looking around as though lost or staring into space.  Your Jack Russell might not seem to instantly recognise you.  These are all potential signs of canine dementia, it’s a good idea to get him or her checked by the vet.  Confusion can often be a sign of urinary tract infection.

Sleeping More: They sleep more and sleep more soundly.

 Here are some tips of how you should you care for your Jack Russell as they slow down into their twilight years.

Slow down and shortening the walks for your senior Jack Russell, exercise is important, but so is not overdoing it.  Try and keep walks to the same length every time and devise away to carry them some of the time when going on longer walks.

Consider switching to a diet especially for senior dogs.  This is especially important if they suffer any tummy upsets or joint stiffness.  Check that the new diet has added joint supplementation.

They may not find it so easy to jump into their favourite chair.  Place a stool or similar in a suitable place to help them get up and down.

As they age they may feel and suffer from the cold more.  Make sure they have somewhere warm and comfortable to sleep at night.

Talk to the vet if you have any worries about their health.

If you enjoyed this article you might also like to read about Jack Russell Health and Jack Russell Weight

Why do Jack Russells’ Eat Grass

Why do Jack Russells’ Eat Grass?

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Jack Russells seem particularly prone to eating grass.  So your Jack Russell is not unusual or unique in his or her grazing habit!  

There are a few likely reasons, so let’s explore them here:

A Low Fibre Diet

Just like us, Jack Russells’ need fibre in their diet to aid digestion.  In the wild dogs would have taken on berries, grasses and other plant material in small quantities to balance their diets.   Domesticated dogs seem to instinctively know that eating grass will help them.  If your Jack Russell eats grass a lot, take a look at the nutritional information on their food.  

He Feels Sick or Bloated

When you Jack Russell feels sick or bloated, they will eat grass to make themselves sick and alleviate their discomfort.  Frequently, you will notice when there is a choice, when they are eating grass to bring on sickness they choose longer, thicker grass and eat it long rather than chewing it up small as they ‘d do to create fibre. 

If eating grass and being sick is a frequent occurrence, having him or her checked over by a vet is a good idea to ensure there are no underlying causes why he or she is making themselves sick.  

Hunger

Jack Russells are frequently greedy little dogs, they love to snack.  A hungry Jack Russell will eat grass when there is nothing preferable around. 

Habit

Once established as a habit, your Jack Russell may continue to go outside and eat the grass.  This could continue to start with and maybe ongoing after any lack of fibre has been addressed.  Usually they eventually stop on their own.

If it’s a habit that you don’t like and there is no explanation for, using distraction techniques work to break the habit. Just be careful that the clever, wiley Jack Russell doesn’t see it as a way of gaining your attention when out in the garden. 

Pleasure

Have you ever sat in a meadow and chewed on a piece of grass while you enjoy the sun on your face and the beauty of the day?  If not, then you should!  When a Jack Russell who is otherwise fit and healthy, mooches around the garden or park on a beautiful day and picks some grass to chew on, chances are they are doing it for the sheer pleasure of doing so.

Taste and Smell

As well as their very strong noses, dogs gain messages from their environment through their sense of taste.  If you observe Jack Russell closely, they will run the grass through their mouths and not actually bite it off to chew and eat.  They are just experiencing the taste and whatever messages that gives them.

Finally

As I said at the start Jack Russells’ are keen grass eaters.  They just seem to enjoy grazing and if they are otherwise fit and well, then let them enjoy their pleasure.

If you enjoyed this article you might also like to read about Jack Russell Food

Rescue a Jack Russell

Rescue a Jack Russell

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If you are thinking about anew family pet, Jack Russells are a bundle of fun – full of energy and very intelligent. They suit an active family who has time to go walking and play with them. For various reasons, people often look for a puppy. Admittedly, they are easier to train from a young age, especially on recall as little pups follow you everywhere! But if you have patience and the ability to rescue a Jack Russell then you definitely should!

Reasons to rescue a Jack Russell

  • You will be saving a dog from the shelter (or even worse being put to sleep).
  • If more people rescue a Jack Russell than buy puppies then the demand for pups will decrease and this will reduce puppy farming, puppy farms are profit driven and they don’t have the dogs best interest at heart and many bitches can be forced to have too many litters.
  • Your dog will love you for life and his eyes will always thank you for rescuing him!
  • Usually skip the puppy stage! (there really are pros and cons to this!)
  • Rescues that come from a charity or shelter usually come microchipped, spayed and vaccinated.

The Challenges of Rescuing a Jack Russell

There are many challenges of rescuing a Jack Russell. Rescue dogs are often more fearful and less socialised than dogs you get as puppies. They often have not had the training that they need and also can have some behavioural difficulties such as snapping or not being toilet trained. You need to consider this carefully and make sure that you have the time and dedication needed to rescue a dog. Consider any children or other pets that you might have. How would it effect them and how will you ensure that everyone in the house is safe?

My first two Jack Russells were puppies and were really great pets. They were great off-lead too and had good recall. When I finally got my own house after university, I decided that I would continue to have Jack Russells but that I would rather rescue than get puppies, because I was upset at how many dogs were in the shelter and didn’t have a loving home.

Then came Milo – he was the cutest and most perfect specimen of a Jack Russell. But there were a few problems when I first got him. He pooped and weed on the DOUBLE BED!!!! He was not house trained at all when we got him! He did actually get used to going outside within a couple of weeks. But the other scary things were that he growled and snapped at me once when I went to stroke him. This really startled me, but he just wasn’t secure enough to be stroke when he wasn’t expecting it. He developed a strong bond with me after that and it never happened again. He also went for another dog quite badly and so we never let him off the lead – he just wasn’t friendly enough to be trusted. But all in all he ended up being the most wonderful and faithful little dog.

My next rescue after Milo was Blake – a gorgeous brown Jack Russell Patterdale cross. He came to us from the RSPCA and his file said that he came from a home with domestic violence. He was very weary of strange men and barked at my husband a lot when he first arrived (now he totally loves him!) One of the things that shocked my was how scared he was of raised voices – once I told him off and he was so scared he weed himself there and then! Poor boy! We were kind as possible to him for the first 3 months of having him and he settled well and grew in confidence.

How Long will it take for my Rescue Dog to Settle?

I learnt that it’s important to consider their background and the way that they were treated by previous owners to figure out what is scary for them and what is OK. As a general rule it takes them 3 days to get out of the ‘shell shocked’ stage, 3 weeks to start to adjust and 3 months to finally feel comfortable and build trust. So it is important that you give them that time is you rescue a Jack Russell.

Where to get your Rescue Jack Russell

Go to a reputable charity or dog shelter to rescue your Jack Russell. This will mean that they have had the necessary checks needed to be rehomed. They will have been neutered, microchipped and vaccinated. I have adopted Jack Russells from both the RSPCA and the Dog’s Trust. There are also several websites dedicated to terrier rescue.

RSPCA – These dogs are often rescued from abusive situations or households with domestic violence. As a result, they will need extra patience, love and care. We got our Blake from here and although he has been a challenge, he has an extremely strong bond with us now and we love him so much! The RSPCA is the largest animal welfare charity in the UK.

Dog’s Trust – The Dogs Trust is the charity where I got my first rescue JRT – Milo. You can filter on the website by size and breed which is great if you are specifically looking for a Jack Russell. They have branches all around the UK including Glasgow, Manchester, Leeds and Devon.

Oldies – Dedicated to the rescue of Older senior dogs, this is a great website to find an older Jack Russell.

Have you ever rescued a Jack Russell? If so, we would love to hear you and find out how you are getting on! Please comment on our blog below 😉

If you enjoyed this article you might also like to read about Jack Russell Rescue