Rescue a Jack Russell

Rescue a Jack Russell

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If you are thinking about anew family pet, Jack Russells are a bundle of fun – full of energy and very intelligent. They suit an active family who has time to go walking and play with them. For various reasons, people often look for a puppy. Admittedly, they are easier to train from a young age, especially on recall as little pups follow you everywhere! But if you have patience and the ability to rescue a Jack Russell then you definitely should!

Reasons to rescue a Jack Russell

  • You will be saving a dog from the shelter (or even worse being put to sleep).
  • If more people rescue a Jack Russell than buy puppies then the demand for pups will decrease and this will reduce puppy farming, puppy farms are profit driven and they don’t have the dogs best interest at heart and many bitches can be forced to have too many litters.
  • Your dog will love you for life and his eyes will always thank you for rescuing him!
  • Usually skip the puppy stage! (there really are pros and cons to this!)
  • Rescues that come from a charity or shelter usually come microchipped, spayed and vaccinated.

The Challenges of Rescuing a Jack Russell

There are many challenges of rescuing a Jack Russell. Rescue dogs are often more fearful and less socialised than dogs you get as puppies. They often have not had the training that they need and also can have some behavioural difficulties such as snapping or not being toilet trained. You need to consider this carefully and make sure that you have the time and dedication needed to rescue a dog. Consider any children or other pets that you might have. How would it effect them and how will you ensure that everyone in the house is safe?

My first two Jack Russells were puppies and were really great pets. They were great off-lead too and had good recall. When I finally got my own house after university, I decided that I would continue to have Jack Russells but that I would rather rescue than get puppies, because I was upset at how many dogs were in the shelter and didn’t have a loving home.

Then came Milo – he was the cutest and most perfect specimen of a Jack Russell. But there were a few problems when I first got him. He pooped and weed on the DOUBLE BED!!!! He was not house trained at all when we got him! He did actually get used to going outside within a couple of weeks. But the other scary things were that he growled and snapped at me once when I went to stroke him. This really startled me, but he just wasn’t secure enough to be stroke when he wasn’t expecting it. He developed a strong bond with me after that and it never happened again. He also went for another dog quite badly and so we never let him off the lead – he just wasn’t friendly enough to be trusted. But all in all he ended up being the most wonderful and faithful little dog.

My next rescue after Milo was Blake – a gorgeous brown Jack Russell Patterdale cross. He came to us from the RSPCA and his file said that he came from a home with domestic violence. He was very weary of strange men and barked at my husband a lot when he first arrived (now he totally loves him!) One of the things that shocked my was how scared he was of raised voices – once I told him off and he was so scared he weed himself there and then! Poor boy! We were kind as possible to him for the first 3 months of having him and he settled well and grew in confidence.

How Long will it take for my Rescue Dog to Settle?

I learnt that it’s important to consider their background and the way that they were treated by previous owners to figure out what is scary for them and what is OK. As a general rule it takes them 3 days to get out of the ‘shell shocked’ stage, 3 weeks to start to adjust and 3 months to finally feel comfortable and build trust. So it is important that you give them that time is you rescue a Jack Russell.

Where to get your Rescue Jack Russell

Go to a reputable charity or dog shelter to rescue your Jack Russell. This will mean that they have had the necessary checks needed to be rehomed. They will have been neutered, microchipped and vaccinated. I have adopted Jack Russells from both the RSPCA and the Dog’s Trust. There are also several websites dedicated to terrier rescue.

RSPCA – These dogs are often rescued from abusive situations or households with domestic violence. As a result, they will need extra patience, love and care. We got our Blake from here and although he has been a challenge, he has an extremely strong bond with us now and we love him so much! The RSPCA is the largest animal welfare charity in the UK.

Dog’s Trust – The Dogs Trust is the charity where I got my first rescue JRT – Milo. You can filter on the website by size and breed which is great if you are specifically looking for a Jack Russell. They have branches all around the UK including Glasgow, Manchester, Leeds and Devon.

Oldies – Dedicated to the rescue of Older senior dogs, this is a great website to find an older Jack Russell.

Have you ever rescued a Jack Russell? If so, we would love to hear you and find out how you are getting on! Please comment on our blog below 😉

If you enjoyed this article you might also like to read about Jack Russell Rescue

Jack Russells Training

Are Jack Russells Easy to Train?

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Are Jack Russells easy to train? Well the simple answer is yes because they are very intelligent dogs. They are very food motivated and eager to please which means that they will learn quickly. However, although they are easy to train in the house, you may find that their strong prey drive and distraction makes it a challenge to train them out in the park. As soon as they see another dog or rabbit or whatever they want to chase they can be off like shot!

Let’s take a look in more detail at how east they are to train for all the important things including toilet training, obedience, tricks and recall.

Are Jack Russells easy to toilet train?

Yes – Jack Russells pick up toilet training very quickly. Of course if you are training a puppy you need to have more patience and allow for accidents. It could take a few weeks for a young puppy to learn where to go. For an adult dog, it can be quicker than a week – both of my rescue Jack Russells picked it up in about 3 days with positive reinforcement – treat as soon as they do it in the right place!

Are Jack Russells easy to train for Obedience and Tricks?

Yes they totally are! Start with the basics such as sit, down, stand (here’s our article on Jack Russell obedience training if you want to read that first). They will pick it up very quickly by following the movement of the treat in your hand (and eventually by your hand without the treat!).

Are Jack Russells easy to train for Recall?

The simple is is NO they are not! Let’s be realistic though, if you teach them recall off lead from a puppy they will probably be fine. But, teaching an adult Jack Russell is a whole different ball game. The problem with Jack Russells is that they were bred as hunting dogs and as a result have a very high prey drive. So they might be doing well with training outside, until they see a cat or squirrel in which case they just take off and run in the completely opposite direction!!! This can be very dangerous particularly if they run across a main road or in the path of cyclists. If you don’t have 100% recall on your dog avoid letting him off lead in public spaces until you do. You can hire fields for recall training.

Jack Russell Rescue

Jack Russell Rescue

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Jack Russell rescue is one of the most awarding parts of my life – you will get an unconditional love like no other from rescuing a Jack Russell! It’s so easy to fall in love with this excitable and energetic breed. So is a Jack Russell the right dog for you? Where do you go to rescue a Jack Russell? And how do you help your new rescue dog to settle into his new home?

Is a Rescue Jack Russell Right for me?

A rescue Jack Russell could be right for you if:

  • You have experience with dogs particularly terriers
  • You are training minded and able to use positive reinforcement dog training methods
  • You have a safe and secure home with a decent yard or garden
  • You have no children (or children used to dogs or old enough to understand how to respect them and treat them)
  • You have no other pets such as cats or hamsters (Jack Russells are prey driven so this could be a recipe for disaster!)
  • You are an active household who enjoys the outdoors and walking/hiking
  • You work short hours or work from home

Where to Look for a Rescue Jack Russell

If you are looking for a Jack Russell rescue, go to a reputable shelter or charity, because this will mean that they have had the necessary checks needed to be rehomed. They will have been neutered, microchipped and vaccinated. I have adopted Jack Russells from both the RSPCA (Blake) and the Dog’s Trust (Milo). There are also several websites dedicated to terrier and Jack Russell rescue.

Certainly avoid puppy farms which are unethical, profit driven and don’t have the dogs best interests at heart. I would also avoid buying online through Facebook or Craigslist because this may be people who are profit driven and have not done the necessary checks needed before rehoming the dog. Facebook now actually bans the sale of dogs and puppies for animal welfare reasons.

Here are some of the best places to look for a rescue Jack Russell:

Dog’s Trust – I got my first rescue Jack Russell Terrier Milo from the Dog’s Trust and he was one in a million! You can filter on the website by size and breed which is great if you are specifically looking for a Jack Russell. They have branches all around the UK including Glasgow, Manchester, Leeds and Devon.

RSPCA – Dogs rehomed by the RSPCA are often rescued from abusive situations or households with domestic violence. As a result, they will need extra patience, love and care. We got our Blake from here and although he has been a challenge, he has an extremely strong bond with us now and we love him so much! The RSPCA is the largest animal welfare charity in the UK.

Jack Russell Terrier Rescue – Jack Russell Rescue UK is a non-profit organisation that specialises in rescuing Jack Russells. They never put a healthy dog to sleep and they rehome dogs all over the UK. Their dogs are mainly in foster homes in Wales, North London, Essex, Hertfordshire, Kent, Cheshire, & West Yorkshire before they are adopted. This helps them to socialise and get used to family life.

Oldies – Dedicated to the rescue of Older senior dogs, this is a great website to find an older Jack Russell.

A Better Life Dog Rescue – A Better Life Dog Rescue specialises in rescuing dogs from Romania and helps them to get the medical treatment that they need before being re-homed in the UK. Many are large dogs but the often have Jack Russell mix type terriers. It’s an excellent place to get your dog if you want to rescue from abroad.

Bringing your Rescue Jack Russell Home

When your new Jack Russell arrives home, he/she will be quite shocked at first. He/she may not want to eat or drink straight away and may wee or poo in the house. Fill your new pets life with kindness. Have plenty of food and water always readily available and let your new dog eat and drink when they want to and when they feel comfortable to do so. It is important to recognise that they might not want cuddles and strokes straight away – give your new dog space that he needs to settle and when he has developed a bond he can come to you. Don’t do anything that might stress out your dog in his early days such as put him in the bath or leave him alone for prolonged periods. Here are my top tips for bringing your rescue dog home…

  • Stock up on all the dog essentials that you might need including food, bed, lead, treats and poo bags.
  • Make sure that he has a place to go to where he feels safe – his bed or crate is very important in the early days.
  • Don’t use the crate as punishment – if you use a crate keep it open and he can have it as his ‘safe place’
  • Avoid bathing your dog or taking your dog to too many unfamiliar place in the early days.
  • Give him space – don’t approach and stroke your new dog too often in the early days – let him approach you.

Do you have a rescue Jack Russell? If so, we’d love to hear your story! Please comment on our blog below…

If you enjoyed this article you might also like to read about Rescue a Jack Russell

Jack Russell Behaviour

Jack Russell Behaviour

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Jack Russells are a bundle of fun – energetic dogs that have a loyal attachment to their owner. This breed is not for everyone, but if you enjoy the outdoors and are training minded then they make excellent pets. Here’s the lowdown on Jack Russell behaviour – what can you expect from a Jack Russell and how to deal with it.

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There used to be a strong ‘Alpha’ training method that was very based on discipline and their place in the pack under you as the owner. However, these methods are now outdated training methods and positive reinforcement has been proven to be kinder to the dog and have better results. We avoid the used of physical punishment and shock collars – not only is it cruel but not actually necessary.

Velcro Dog – Separation Anxiety Behaviour

Jack Russells are highly loyal and affectionate towards their owners. They develop a strong bond that can sometimes be so strong that it becomes unhealthy as it causes stress for the Jack Russell to be left alone. This kind of Jack Russell behaviour makes it almost impossible for you to go out and holidays without your dog are off the cards! Separation anxiety behaviour can including constant barking or howling, destructive behaviour (such as chewing or destroying furniture) or weeing and pooing in the house in protest.

Your dog needs to socialise with other people and get used to you being away from him slowly (build it up). When you leave your dog alone do so for short periods of time at first so just 10-15 minutes to the corner shop initially. eave the house and re-enter as if it’s completely normal – don’t make a fuss of your dog when you leave or return. You can then build this up to 30 minutes, 1 hour and finally up to about 3-4 hours. When your dog is left for the slightly longer periods make sure he has a little walk to get ’empty’ before you leave him. You can also leave him with something to do such as a Dog Puzzle or KONG! The medium sized Kong Extreme is perfect for Jack Russells and you can stuff it with something tasty such as Yogurt (and freeze it!) or Mutt Butter.

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If you want to keep an eye on your dog while you are out then I highly suggest a good dog camera such as the Wansview or Furbo dog camera. You can keep an eye on him on your mobile phone and then come straight home if there are any urgent problems (e.g. risk of choking)

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Regarding overnight stays without your dog and even holidays, whoever is going to ‘dog sit’ for you while you are out or away should be welcomed into your home regularly and develop a bond with your dog by giving him fuss and treats.

Prey Drive Behaviour

A Jack Russell has a natural and inbuilt prey drive that is difficult to eradicate. This can also mean that Jack Russells find off lead recall a challenge once this prey drive kicks in. It can be distressing if you see your Jack Russell kill a small animal such as a rabbit, mouse or squirrel, but it is a natural instinct for him and so you cannot discipline him for this behaviour.

The best thing to do is keep your dog in an enclosed space and away from small fast moving furry things! Avoid letting your dog off lead in an area where there are lots of squirrels or rabbits (unless of course he is a working dog protecting a farm from rats!) So that your JRT still gets his exercise you can consider getting a long leash or even a climbing rope (very secure) so that he can run around freely without the worry of him darting across a main road because he’s seen a cat!

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Guarding or Aggressive Behaviour

If trained and socialised well, Jack Russells rarely show aggression to people or other dogs. When Jack Russells do show aggression it’s usually due to fear or guarding behaviour. For fear of strangers or protectiveness of owner, you can use clicker training. The dog first learns to associate a clicker sound with getting a treat (treat must be administered within 5 seconds). Once your dog understands that the click means a reward you can use it when he is displaying the desired behaviour e.g. not being aggressive. Get closer to the person or thing that he is protecting and continue to click treat. As soon as the undesired aggressive behaviour starts turn your back and the click treating immediately stops.

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If your dog is aggressive when you go near his toys or food, you can teach him the ‘trade’ game. When he gives up his toy he gets another toy in return (or a chew or a treat!) Slowly he begins to learn that it is OK to give something up and that there is no need to display aggression.

Digging

Digging is a natural Jack Russell Behaviour, but when it is in the wrong place such as a lawn or flower bed, this behaviour can become a problem. The best way to deal with digging behaviour is to divert the focus and allow him or her to dig somewhere else. For example, you could get your dog a sandpit and encourage digging there for treats and bones. He is then allowed to display this natural behaviour and knows where the digging can take place. If he digs in the wrong place, a simple ‘no!’ or ‘Ah-ah’ will do the trick. Then place him in his allocated digging area and encourage it there.

Leash Reactivity

Jack Russells can develop leash reactivity due to their prey drive and high energy levels. This could manifest itself as pulling, lunging and even growling and barking at things that go past which could include other dogs, scooters and bikes/motorcycles. This is a difficult Jack Russell behaviour to break them out of. Exercise will help – if your JRT is inadequately exercised then you can expect this behaviour to get worse.

Clicker training is an excellent way to correct this behaviour. It may take time and may not eradicate the behaviour 100%, but with every JRT I have done this with I have seen an improvement. They will quickly realise that when you see another dog/bike/whetever then if they don’t bark meat falls from the sky!

Scent Marking

As Jack Russells are very intelligent, they tend to toilet train within just a few days of being treated when they do it in the right place. However, some Jack Russells display ‘scent marking’ behaviour when they wee in the house a small amount to leave their scent. It’s like them saying ‘this is my gaff!’ This behaviour is particularly bad with male Jack Russells who just love cocking their leg! To stop this undesirable and very stinky behaviour you need to catch him in the act every time. This means that your JRT won’t be able to be left alone until he has been trained out of this behaviour. As soon as you see him go to cock his leg you need to firmly tell him ‘no!’ or ‘ah-ah’ and then immediately place him outside. When he does it outside it should result in lots of immediate praise and treats. He will soon get the message!

If you enjoyed this article you might also like to read about Jack Russell Personality and Jack Russell Tricks

Jack Russell Tricks

Jack Russell Tricks

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You will be pleased to know that Jack Russells are highly intelligent dogs that are very food motivated. This makes it quite easy to teach them how to do tricks. They really enjoy learning and aim to please, so they are great little dogs for this! In my experience Jack Russells learn very quickly in the comfort of their own home. It’s the outdoor training that they tend to struggle with more because of their alertness and inbuilt prey drive. So what are the best Jack Russell tricks that you can teach your dog?

Best Jack Russell Tricks

1. Shake a Paw (and the other one!)

If you put your Jack Russell in a sit and then tap the back of his front leg while you have a treat in your hand, he will lift his paw. You can treat this to show it’s a desired action. Then, you can start to shake it and only offer the treat once he has allowed the shake. Before long, ‘paw’ will be instant! You can then repeat with the other leg and ask for ‘paw’ and then the ‘other one!’ It literally took Blake a couple of hours to get this!

2. Spin Round

Spin round is very easy with a food motivated dog. You can simply let him smell the treat to create interest and then make the circular motion with it. His body will naturally follow the treat and you an get him used to that motion with the ‘spin round’ command. You can then make the circular motion a little higher and repeat the instruction. Quite quickly, your dog will be able to spin round on command and even on the circular hand motion alone!

3. Stand Up

This is another one of those easy Jack Russell tricks for food motivated dogs. Simply hold a tasty treat high in the air and he will automatically stand up to try and reach it. When he does it the first time let him have the treat straight away. The second time hold it a little higher and introduce the command ‘up’ (not to confuse with ‘stand’ because the ‘stand’ command can be used to get your dog standing on four legs – not two – from a sitting position!).

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Having a Jack Russell as a Pet

Having a Jack Russell as a Pet

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Anyone who’s ever owned a Jack Russell knows that they require a lot of special care. Besides being energetic, Jack Russells are notoriously stubborn, and can be highly-strung. They need a lot of exercise in order to stay healthy, and they can have trouble living peacefully with other pets if not properly socialized. Plus, they have strong genetic prey drive and herding instincts which means they often try to chase small animals and herd humans for fun.

My Jack Russells have all had their own little personality and funny quirky things that they do – and I’ve now owned 4 during my lifetime. So I feel well placed to answer your question about being a Jack Russell owner. So what’s it really like having a Jack Russell as a pet?

Having a Jack Russell as a Pet

A Jack Russell is not the easiest pet to own — but if you have the time and dedication needed for this unique breed of canine friend, owning one is truly an unforgettable experience to enjoy with your best furry pal as your sidekick. There are pros and cons to having a Jack Russell, so it’s just a case of making sure that it will fit in with your life and that you have the time and energy to give him (or her) what he needs.

Having a Jack Russell as a pet has got me through some really bad times including relationship breakdowns, deaths in the family and a severe bout of depression. To have that cute furry face looking up at you and asking for his food or walkies gives you a routine and a strong sense of purpose.

My last Jack Russell terrier, Milo came everywhere with me – to the pub, on the bus and even to work! I was so heartbroken that I said I could never have another one, yet 2 years later Blake the Jack Russell Patterdale cross came into our life to fill the furry void left behind! He has bought us so much joy and certainly got us through the last year of Coronavirus restrictions and lockdowns.

Pros of Having a Jack Russell

  • Will ensure that you get daily exercise
  • Gives you a routine (feeding, walking, playing)
  • Social life of walking the dog and mixing with other dog owners (dog owners always talk to each other!)
  • A sense of purpose
  • Cuddles and companionship (they are very loyal and loving towards their owner)
  • Easy to train for tricks
  • Healthy dogs – they are happy and energetic

Cons of Having a Jack Russell

  • Difficult to train off lead due to their strong pray drive
  • Can be snappy without socialisation and training
  • Need to be at home majority of the time – can’t really leave them more than 3 hours
  • Destructive behaviour when left alone too long
  • Difficult to have a holiday without family members to look after them – they don’t do well in kennels and being apart from their owner
  • Need to be able to spend at least an hour a day walking them
  • Cost of having a dog can be high – need regular worming and annual injections and vets checkup plus food
  • Can be leash reactive and reactive towards other dogs and fast moving things such as bikes and scooters.

Having a Jack Russell as a Pet – What will my day look like?

AM – Morning walkies and Food

Firstly, don’t expect a lie in if you have a Jack Russell – not even on the weekend! You will need to get up early with your dog around 7am to let him out to the loo. Walking him last thing at night and getting up early to let him out will minimise accidents in the house. After letting him/her to the loo at 7am you can then have half an hour for your own breakfast and getting ready. Then you will need to take at least half an hour for a walk in the park with your dog.

You can feed your dog when he gets back from his morning walk – Jack Russells like to eat after they have been out because it mimics the result of the ‘hunt’ from when they were in the wild. Also, the exercise works up their appetite.

PM – Afternoon loo or walk and snack

If you work from home, fantastic, but if you don’t you will need to come back home at lunch time to let your Jack Russell to the loo. If you cannot do this, ask a family member or friend to help you out. Otherwise, you will need to budget for a dog sitter for a 20 minute lunch time visit for a short loo trip or walk plus treat. It’s nice to leave them with a chew in the afternoon.

Evening – Food, Last Walk ad Cuddles/Play Time

After work you will be feeding and walking your Jack Russell for the second time. It is essential that they get at least 2 walkies and extended walks on the weekends (read more on Jack Russell exercise).

In the evenings expect lots of cuddles while you watch TV! They are very affectionate dogs when you have developed a bond together. However, there may be an hour of hyperactivity (well call this ‘happy hour!’) around 9pm-10pm when they get a spurt of energy and want to play. You can play fetch, tug-o-war and rough and tumble play with your JRT – they love rough housing!

Weekends

On Weekends plan for training sessions with your Jack Russell and also extended walks with the family. Ideas for weekend getaways include Snowdonia, Peak District, Lake District and the Scottish Highlands.

Going on Holiday when you have a Jack Russell

Holidays abroad will be more of a challenge because many Jack Russell owners find it difficult to leave them. But if you have a car or van and your dog has a passport you can consider travelling with your Jack Russell within the EU.

They have a Strong Prey Drive

The Jack Russell Terrier is a small terrier that has an energetic disposition and strong hunting instincts….They require a firm owner who can display leadership. If your Jack Russell has a particularly strong prey drive and doesn’t have good recall due to this, then it can be difficult to let him off lead in public areas.

There are things that you can do to ensure that your Jack Russell still gets the exercise off lead that it needs. It is possible to hire enclosed fields for dogs to to online and on Facebook – we use Mutts off Lead in Maghull. You can also purchase a long 30m leash or climbing rope to allow them to run around while you still have control.

Jack Russells need Socialisation

They also require extensive early socialisation to help them get along with other dogs, because they are prone to fighting with dogs twice their size.

Additionally, they should not be left alone for extended periods of time; without sufficient companionship, the Jack Russell is likely to engage in destructive behaviour. They can be prone to separation anxiety which could result in crying, howling and barking when you leave the house.

Training your Jack Russell

The Jack Russell Terrier is a smart dog who is quick to learn, with a high degree of trainability. All of my Jack Russells have been very food motivated and eager to please. As a result I have been able to teach them a number of party tricks including spin round, roll over, beg and play dead. My second Jack Russell Suzy was so disciplined that she could hold a biscuit in her mouth or on her nose and wait until you told her to eat it!

As well as doing tricks, you will also need to teach your Jack Russell to be ok with strangers and to behave well on walkies. Clicker training is a great option for Jack Russells as they respond very well to positive reinforcement. You can read more about training a Jack Russell here.

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Jack Russell Food

Jack Russell Food

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When choosing your Jack Russell food, you will need to make decisions based on several factors including your dogs weight, health conditions and personal preferences. First of all, you will need to decide whether to feed your Jack Russell dried food, wet food (canned), natural cooked diet or raw.

Why a Good Dog Food is important

A good dog food is important because a good quality food in the right amount it will keep your dog healthy and the right weight without becoming obese. You can read more about a healthy Jack Russell Weight here. Choosing the right food can also have an impact on your dogs healthy and shiny coat and overall general health.

Which Jack Russell Food should I Choose?

Let’s take a look at the main options for Jack Russell food included some recommended brands. Remember that before making a decision it is often a good idea to take professional advice as all dogs are different. Different dogs have different health conditions and personal preferences. When getting a Jack Russell puppy from a breeder, they will often come with recommendations for puppy food that they have been on at home when weaning. It is a similar situation when adopting a dog from a rescue centre – they will often recommend a good food for your dog. It is also recommended that you take your vets advice on feeding your dog. Your dog will need a first trip to the vets for other advice such as vaccinations and worming and so you can discuss feeding at this first vets appointment. If you inherit your dog or rescue from the streets, it is vital to take that first vets trip to identify any health problems or underlying conditions.

Dry Food or Kibble

Kibble such as Chappie or Iams can be good for a dog who has a very sensitive stomach. Our Jack Russell-Patterdale cross Blake had a bout of Colitis before we adopted him and the RSPCA recommended to keep him on the Chappie that settled his stomach. We still feed him Chappie kibble a couple of years later, but we supplement his diet with other snacks and treats such as cooked chicken or ham.

Dry dog food is sometimes criticised for being high in grain and so if you are concerned about this you can opt for a grain free Kibble such as Lily’s Kitchen. however, many vets argue that a small amount of grain in your dogs diet is a good thing, so don’t worry too much. We feel that the key thing is not to ONLY give your dog kibble, but to supplement with other treats such as the cooked chicken, or even cut up bits of cooked sausage. This works very well for Jack Russell Tarining!

Wet Food and Mixer

Canned dog food is surely a tasty option – most Jack Russells really love it! All my other Jack Russells (Patch, Suzy and Milo) were on wet (canned) dog food and a mixer. My favourite canned dog foods for them are Butchers and Bounce – nutritious and excellent value. Other popular options include Lily’s Kitchen and Forthglade dog food.

Using mixer biscuits can add variety to their wet food meal – it adds starch to their diet and aids digestion. We have been very happy with Winalot shapes and Pedigree chum mixer, but also have found good quality mixers in Supermarkets own brand such as Asda.

Natural Cooked Diet

A natural cooked diet can be nutritious and tasty for your dog! There are many options that are healthy if you are cooking for your dog including:

  • Meat – Beef, Turkey, Pork, Chicken, Lamb
  • Fish – Shrimp (fully cooked with shell removed), Tuna,
  • Vegetables – Carrots, Green beans, Spinach, Peas Celery, Cucumbers, Pumpkin, Sweet Potato, Corn.
  • Other – Rice and Eggs (in moderation)

There are some foods that you should certainly avoid for your dog. Never give your dog cooked meat on the bone as it can splinter and get stuck in their throat – this can be extremely dangerous and may result in life saving surgery. For the same reason, never give your dog chicken bones. If you choose to feed your dog pork, make sure that it is fully cooked to avoid lungworm and keep on top of your dogs worming regime (recommended every 3-6 months but check with your vet).

Butternut Box

If you don’t have much time to shop, prepare and cook but you want your dog to eat health gently cooked food then there are many options on subscription. An excellent choice for ordering online is the Butternut Box which is healthy gently cooked food for your dog delivered directly to your front door. You can prepare these in the microwave!

Raw Feeding

Many people are turning to a raw diet for their dogs, However, although dogs would have eaten a lot of raw food in the wild, it is not so ideal for your domesticated pet dog. It’s not ideal to feed your Jack Russell raw meat. By cooking their food for them you eliminate bacteria and worms. They also love the tasty smell of cooked food!

Many people believe that a raw diet can eliminate skin conditions, lead to a shiny coat and improve overall dog health. If you do choose raw then some options will be healthier and more easily digested than others. Raw eggs, brocolli and liver or kidney are excellent options for raw feeding your dog. They can also crunch on raw carrots as a snack.

How much should I feed my Jack Russell? You can use this Raw dog food calculator to work it out.

Overall, we believe in varying your dogs diet for their overall health and well being. So for example, you may choose to feed kibble or wet dog food (with mixer) but then supplement with cooked chicken and raw carrot as snacks and treats.

What do you choose to feed your Jack Russell?

If you enjoyed this article you might also like to read about Jack Russell Health

Types of Jack Russell

Types of Jack Russell

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You probably all know about the Jack Russell, but were you aware that there are different types of Jack Russell? Well, it’s true! Some of the different Jack Russells include rough coated Jack Russells, Parsons Russells, miniature Jack Russells and also the Spanish Jack Russell!

Different Types of Jack Russell

Classic Jack Russell Terrier

The classic Jack Russell terrier is usually smooth haired and tri-coloured – white with black and brown spots on his body and head. The classic Jack Russell is usually short haired, making grooming easy. However, they are a bundle of fun and need a great deal of exercise! Jack Russells shouldn’t have their tails docked unless they are working dogs and it is recommended by a vet and performed before 5 days old (according to English law).

Rough Coated Jack Russell

The rough coated jack Russell looks very much like the classic smooth haired Jack Russell, but with rough fur. This makes them look a little ‘shaggier’ and the fur on their face quite often makes them look like they have a moustache!

Parsons Russell

The ‘Parsons Jack Russell’ is the kennel club registered jack Russell terrier. These are the purebreeds and the Jack Russells that you will typically see on Crufts! It was developed from the original fox terrier in the 18th Century.

Miniature Jack Russell

The miniature Jack Russell or mini-JRT is a popular smaller version of the classic Jack Russell and a popular family pet in the UK and the USA. They have a slightly smaller body and shorter legs than the classic Jack Russell. They are sometimes called a ‘Jack Russell shorty!’

Spanish Jack Russell

The Spanish Jack Russells official name is the ‘Ratonero Bodeguero‘. The look of the Spanish Jack Russell is very similar to the British Jack Russell with similar markings, but longer legs. They are recognisable by the ‘mask’ type face that stands out from their predominantly white body. They are bred for ratting and catching mice in the wine cellars of Andalusia in the South of Spain.

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Jack Russell Border Collie Cross

Jack Russell Border Collie Cross

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A Jack Russell Border Collie cross is a relatively new mix of two breeds, the Border Collie and the Jack Russell Terrier. The Border Collie was originally bred to herd sheep while the Terrier was bred to hunt foxes.

For centuries the two breeds were kept apart by physical separation of farms and by social conventions that led people to believe that Crosses would be undesirable in both farm and hunting environments. This segregation ended in 1993 with a single breeding that created Quint, who showed exceptional herding abilities from an early age.

The original intent of this cross’s breeder, Debbie Lopes, was to create an all-around dog suited for life as a working animal.

What does a Jack Russell Border Collie Cross look like?

The physical requirements for the working cross are:

– Height between 24-29 inches tall at the shoulder. Dogs that are extreme in size and weight will not have the speed necessary to herd sheep and cattle, nor will they have the endurance to work all day.

Dogs that are small are less suited to working because they will not be able to move larger animals. Small dogs are usually better suited for agility events or as pets because they do not like being ordered around (as do some Border Collies).

  • Larger dogs, however, may have more endurance than a Border Collie which can lead to excessive energy requirements.
  • Life expectancy of twelve to fifteen years.
  • Relatively easy to train. The ability to learn is one of the most important traits of this breed.
  • Normal amount and type of coat in a non-shedding variety (everywhere except for around the ears, feet, and tail). This coat will be thicker in winter and finer during warmer months. It can normally be managed with a rake or pin brush and should require little more grooming than an average dog. The coat should also be able to resist the elements of weather and various climates.
  • Genetic predisposition to have a bold personality without being overly aggressive.
  • Ability to learn how to work with sheep and cattle from an early age in a supervised setting. The ability to work with other animals is desirable as well.
  • Ability to find livestock by scent alone, which is why this breed should not be used for pet retrieval and needs less exposure to different environments before being trained.
  • Moderate size, unlike some dog breeds associated with herding that are known to have a small body and large head. This is important for the Jack Russell Border Collie Cross because, if they do not have a massive bone structure or wide head, they will be unable to control larger animals.

Behaviour and Temperament

The behavioral characteristics of the Jack Russell Border Collie Cross are:

  • A bold personality with high endurance. These dogs are natural hunters and herders and will be eager to learn new things. However, they will need a lot of patience and consistency in order to be trained properly.
  • Great companions because they are affectionate and independent at the same time. They do not need excessive amounts of attention, but will give as much love as they receive from their master or family members.

If you enjoyed this article you might also like to read about Jack Russell Beagle Cross and Jack Russell Shih tzu Cross

Jack Russell Beagle Cross

Jack Russell Beagle Cross

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If you’re looking for a new pup, you may want to consider the Jack Russell Beagle cross. This crossbreed is a mix of two different purebreds: the smaller and more agile Jack Russell Terrier and the larger, longer-legged Beagle.

As far as temperament goes, they are known for being bold, friendly dogs who generally get along with everyone. The Beagle’s sense of smell makes it easy to train these dogs because they love to follow their noses wherever they lead them.

If you decide to get a Jack Russell Beagle, here are some things you should know.

Pure or Crossbreed?

First things first: when you go into a shelter or rescue to adopt your new dog, don’t be fooled into thinking that all dogs with “Jack Russell” in their name are purebred. Just because they share the same name, that doesn’t mean they share the same looks or temperament. Some shelters even mistakenly think that they’re referring to Jack Russell Terriers when they say “Jack Russell.” They’re not! Be sure to ask for proof of the dog’s heritage before you decide if he’s right for you and your family.

The Origins of Jack Russell Terriers

Jack Russell Terriers are believed to have originated in the United Kingdom, somewhere around the end of the 19th century. Since then, they’ve been used as hunting dogs mainly in England and Ireland. The Jack Russell Beagle was developed during World War II by a British soldier who kept several Beagles with him on his military bases in Ireland to help protect them from being eaten by other animals (especially foxes). Later, he crossed those dogs with American Jack Russell Terriers and began breeding them for companionship. These little dogs quickly grew into smaller versions of their bigger cousins’ size and personality.

Appearance of a Jack Russell Beagle Cross

The Jack Russell Beagle cross can be any size but usually weighs 10 to 18 pounds. They have combinations of colors that include red, white, orange, black, brown and yellow. Their long ears are set low on their heads and hang down a bit at the base. Their eyes tend to be round and dark in color. Their furry tails come to a point at the tip. Some have flaps of skin on their front legs and have longer faces than most Beagles. Their short coats are soft, wavy or straight and silky in texture.

As for grooming, you’ll want to brush their coats often to keep them from getting too tangled and to keep them healthy. They don’t need professional grooming but a simple combing and brushing should do it. Their nails will need regular trimming, too.

Temperament of the Jack Russell Beagle Cross

Above all else, the Jack Russell Beagle is well known for being extremely energetic. This breed needs lots of exercise and play time with you in order to be happy pets. They crave attention from their owners and love spending time with their families outside or inside the home (as long as they’re not left home alone for too long). They are very loyal dogs who tend to follow their owners around the house wherever they go. They also enjoy playing with their owners and will be very active whenever you’re there to play with them.

Because they are so energetic, this dog breed should be taken on four- to five-hour walks each day. Without enough exercise, they may become destructive in the home or act out from boredom. When living in an apartment, you’ll need to get a dog walker that comes early in the morning before work or stay late after work to give these dogs a chance to run around for a bit and burn off some excess energy. In addition, they need lots and lots of toys and puzzles during those times between walks.

If you enjoyed this article you might also like to read about Jack Russell Border Collie Cross and Jack Russell Shih tzu Cross